According to the American Diabetes Association (ABA), millions of people around the world live with diabetes or know someone living with diabetes.

The organization further explains that though the disease isn’t curable, it’s very treatable; with those affected living with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Known for being a “childhood disease,” type 1 diabetes presents itself when the body does not produce insulin.

Insulin is a hormone the body uses to carry “blood sugar” from the bloodstream to the cells within your body.

The counterpart to type 1 diabetes is type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body creates an excess of insulin without knowing how to use it.

The ABA explains that the pancreas is unable to keep up with extra insulin that’s created for the bodies’ “blood sugar” to linger at normal levels.

Here are some ways that the ABA agrees would help people with diabetes keep their disease in check.

Identify your genetics

Although in some cases, this might be difficult, it is imperative you know some information about your families medical history to avoid conflict upon diagnosis.

Watching what your intake

While many know to watch what they eat, few do not know that it can affect more than just their weight. It is best to partake in nurturing foods, drink more water, control your diet and eat less starchy foods.

Get checked

African Americans generally do not have the best track record for visiting their physicians regularly.

According to Doctor Dolapa Bobaola, Associate Professor at Morehouse School of Medicine, regular check-ups are tiny steps that everyone can take towards gain control over their life.

While there are many ways to prevent and treat diabetes, it is also important to take initiative to educate and attempt to inform others on prevalent health issues within the community.

The American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association are excellent resources to learn more about diabetes and how to get involved within the city of Atlanta.

To learn more information on how to become more involved, visit http://www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/local-offices/atlanta-georgia.

(Photo: Adobe Stock)

Alexis Grace is a recent graduate of Clark Atlanta University and a current Graduate student at Agnes Scott College. During and after her time at CAU, she has worked and interned for several publications...

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