I’ve come to believe that it’s the little concepts and truths about being Christian that when studied, make really good sense and are the most profound realities of life.

Rather than being as complicated as we would make Him, it is important to know that our God is not a God of confusion.

For instance, our concept of investing is relatively easy to understand.

You invest to get a reasonable return on your money or, a reasonable return on your effort or your time.

The question then, from a Christian point of view, is if you think eternity is based on the investment you make while you’re alive, what if anything is the expected return to you for the life you invested here when you die?

I am not trying to be second-guessed here. I know you cannot ear your way into heaven. It is and always has been God’s gift of unearned grace that makes all that happen.

But since we know the physical world is temporary and not the endo of our being, it stands to reason that we should look at those things that will be necessary for our next life.

Hence what provisions/investments have you made for yourself in that next life? Knowing that there is a next phase to your existence, have you invested wisely?

I wouldn’t dare suggest that you can invest your way into the kingdom of God, but I am suggesting, as the classic line infers, “that what you do in life does indeed echo in eternity.”

Scripture clearly says, “Do not store up of yourselves treasures on earth where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up of yourselves treasures in heaven where moth and rust do not destroy and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is there will your heart be also.” (Matthew 6:19-21)

It seems to me that the key point to understanding this and subsequently investing wisely is knowing what constitutes a spiritually based treasure.

In the world that’s easy. It’s the tangible manifestation of wealth; be that money, possessions, material things, physical pleasures, etc.

Lifetimes are spent trying to store up these earthly treasures. Matthew’s point, as is mine, is that spiritual treasures, those of faith and knowledge, those of truth are also easily stored.

I believe each day that you acknowledge Christ as Lord and our Father in heaven as sovereign is a day of stored up treasure.

A lifetime of faith and belief you see is a life spent accepting the divine promise of eternal salvation.

We fail every day in our attempt, but through the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross we are allowed to mature as Christians and expand our roles as centers of spreading the gospel, even if only by example.

This maturation process involves transforming oneself by being born again of the spirit and overcoming as best we can the negative temptations of this world.

Simon Peter would say in this way are we productive and effective in our knowledge of the truth about Christ.

“Therefore, my brothers, be all the more eager to make your calling and election sure. For if you do these things, you will never fail, and you will receive a rich welcome into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ? (2 Peter 1:10-11)

I guess I’m saying that as a Christian I understand the value of a dollar. I know I need a few to live and to navigate this world but, I know in the end, they’re actually worthless in the long term, eternally speaking.

My actions, my faith, my understood truth are what matter the most when it comes to investing in my spiritual bank account. Invest well.

May God bless you always.

I’ve come to believe that it’s the little concepts and truths about being Christian that when studied, make really good sense and are the most profound realities of life.

Rather than being as complicated as we would make Him, it is important to know that our God is not a God of confusion.

For instance, our concept of investing is relatively easy to understand.

You invest to get a reasonable return on your money or, a reasonable return on your effort or your time.

The question then, from a Christian point of view, is if you think eternity is based on the investment you make while you’re alive, what if anything is the expected return to you for the life you invested here when you die?

I am not trying to be second-guessed here. I know you cannot ear your way into heaven. It is and always has been God’s gift of unearned grace that makes all that happen.

But since we know the physical world is temporary and not the endo of our being, it stands to reason that we should look at those things that will be necessary for our next life.

Hence what provisions/investments have you made for yourself in that next life? Knowing that there is a next phase to your existence, have you invested wisely?

I wouldn’t dare suggest that you can invest your way into the kingdom of God, but I am suggesting, as the classic line infers, “that what you do in life does indeed echo in eternity.”

Scripture clearly says, “Do not store up of yourselves treasures on earth where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up of yourselves treasures in heaven where moth and rust do not destroy and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is there will your heart be also.” (Matthew 6:19-21)

It seems to me that the key point to understanding this and subsequently investing wisely is knowing what constitutes a spiritually based treasure.

In the world that’s easy. It’s the tangible manifestation of wealth; be that money, possessions, material things, physical pleasures, etc.

Lifetimes are spent trying to store up these earthly treasures. Matthew’s point, as is mine, is that spiritual treasures, those of faith and knowledge, those of truth are also easily stored.

I believe each day that you acknowledge Christ as Lord and our Father in heaven as sovereign is a day of stored up treasure.

A lifetime of faith and belief you see is a life spent accepting the divine promise of eternal salvation.

We fail every day in our attempt, but through the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross we are allowed to mature as Christians and expand our roles as centers of spreading the gospel, even if only by example.

This maturation process involves transforming oneself by being born again of the spirit and overcoming as best we can the negative temptations of this world.

Simon Peter would say in this way are we productive and effective in our knowledge of the truth about Christ.

“Therefore, my brothers, be all the more eager to make your calling and election sure. For if you do these things, you will never fail, and you will receive a rich welcome into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ? (2 Peter 1:10-11)

I guess I’m saying that as a Christian I understand the value of a dollar. I know I need a few to live and to navigate this world but, I know in the end, they’re actually worthless in the long term, eternally speaking.

My actions, my faith, my understood truth are what matter the most when it comes to investing in my spiritual bank account. Invest well.

May God bless you always.

(Photo: Courtesy of James Washington)

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