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In this file photo Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., in Sept. 1957 captured international headlines as it was under integration orders from U.S. District Judge Ronald N. Davies. The day before nine black students were refused admittance, Gov. Orval Faubus to surround the school and to prevent the black students from entering the grounds. Segregation persisted in public education despite the landmark Brown vs Board of Education decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court three years earlier. A new report says many of this nation’s schools are as segregated now as they were in 1980. Photo by William P Straeter.

In this file photo Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., in Sept. 1957 captured international headlines as it was under integration orders from U.S. District Judge Ronald N. Davies. The day before nine black students were refused admittance, Gov. Orval Faubus to surround the school and to prevent the black students from entering the grounds. Segregation persisted in public education despite the landmark Brown vs Board of Education decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court three years earlier. A new report says many of this nation’s schools are as segregated now as they were in 1980. Photo by William P Straeter.

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Schools Still ‘Separate and Unequal’ 60 years after Brown

Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., like others schools, has grown increasingly segregated.

s the 60th anniversary of the United States Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education approaches, a new report by the Economic Policy Institute found that schools are more segregated now than they were in 1980. The U.S. Supreme Court’s May 17, 1954 landmark decision effectively banned racial segregation in schools in Southern states where racially separate schools were far from equal. The report outlines the myriad differences that existed between Black schools and White schools leading up to the 1954 decision.