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This Week in Black History

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This Week in Black History July 5, 1975

On July 5, 1975, Arthur Ashe defeated Jimmy Connors to become the first Black man to win the Wimbledon tennis tournament.

This Week in Black History June 21, 1923

June 21, 1923: Universal Negro Improvement Association founder Marcus Garvey is sentenced to five years in federal prison for mail fraud involving his Black Star Line shipping company.

This Week in Black History June 15, 1921

On June 15, 1921, the immortal jazz pianist Erroll Garner was born in Pittsburgh, Pa.

This Week in Black History June 12, 1963

Medgar W. Evers, civil rights leader, is assassinated in Jackson, Mississippi.

This Week in Black History June 5, 1987

June 5, 1987 - Dr. Mae C. Jemison becomes first Black female astronaut, training to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavor in 1992.

This Week in Black History May 24, 1944

R&B diva Patti LaBelle was born as Patricia Louise Holte on May 24, 1944, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This Week in Black History May 19, 1925

The human rights activist, Malcolm X was born by the name Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska.

This Week in Black History May 10, 1994

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was inaugurated as the first democratically elected State President of South Africa.

This Week in Black History May 5, 1969

Moneta Sleet, Johnson Publications (Ebony/Jet) photographer becomes the first African American to win a Pulitzer Prize for his photograph of Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. and her daughter at her husband’s funeral in Atlanta,GA.

This Week in Black History January 20, 1986

Lee Elder birdies three of his last four holes and then sinks an 18-foot birdie

This Week in Black History April 4, 1967

In what many consider his most controversial political speech, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. announces his opposition to the escalating war in Vietnam.

This Week in Black History March 24, 2002

Halle Berry becomes the first black woman to win an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in “Monster's Ball.”

This Week in Black History March 16, 1827

amaican emigrant John Russworm joined minister Samuel Cornish to found Freedom’s Journal, the nation’s first black newspaper.

This Month in Black History: SCLC founded in 1957

Despite the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution from 1865-1870, African Americans were still living separate-and-unequal lives nearly 100 years later.

This Week in Black History March 11, 1959

“A Raisin In the Sun,” a play written by Chicago playwright Lorraine Hansberry, opens in New York, becoming the first Broadway drama written by a black woman.