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This Week in Black History

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This Week in Black History May 24, 1944

R&B diva Patti LaBelle was born as Patricia Louise Holte on May 24, 1944, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This Week in Black History May 19, 1925

The human rights activist, Malcolm X was born by the name Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska.

This Week in Black History May 10, 1994

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was inaugurated as the first democratically elected State President of South Africa.

This Week in Black History May 5, 1969

Moneta Sleet, Johnson Publications (Ebony/Jet) photographer becomes the first African American to win a Pulitzer Prize for his photograph of Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. and her daughter at her husband’s funeral in Atlanta,GA.

This Week in Black History January 20, 1986

Lee Elder birdies three of his last four holes and then sinks an 18-foot birdie

This Week in Black History April 4, 1967

In what many consider his most controversial political speech, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. announces his opposition to the escalating war in Vietnam.

This Week in Black History March 24, 2002

Halle Berry becomes the first black woman to win an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in “Monster's Ball.”

This Week in Black History March 16, 1827

amaican emigrant John Russworm joined minister Samuel Cornish to found Freedom’s Journal, the nation’s first black newspaper.

This Month in Black History: SCLC founded in 1957

Despite the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution from 1865-1870, African Americans were still living separate-and-unequal lives nearly 100 years later.

This Week in Black History March 11, 1959

“A Raisin In the Sun,” a play written by Chicago playwright Lorraine Hansberry, opens in New York, becoming the first Broadway drama written by a black woman.

This Week in Black History March 5, 1770

Massachusetts sailor Crispus Attacks is shot to death by British redcoats, reportedly becoming the first man killed in the cause of U.S. freedom.

This Month in Black History: King, Abernathy tried in Albany

The year was 1962. President John F. Kennedy had just committed the nation to a war in Vietnam, folk music was morphing into protest music, and the success of the Freedom Rides – bus rides of mostly black students protesting ...

This Month in Black History: Marcus Garvey Imprisoned in Atlanta

The year was 1925. It was four years before the Stock Market Crash of 1929 and life was good for many white Americans.

This month in Black History: Morehouse College

Soon after President Abraham Lincoln’s famous 1863 release of the Emancipation Proclamation, schools of higher learner were quickly being founded to educate newly freed slaves.

This Week in Black History January 31, 1988

Grambling University alum Doug Williams, the first black quarterback to play in a Super Bowl game