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Michael Dunn is found guilty, but not for murdering Jordan Davis

By Sunny Hostin and Greg Botelho CNN | 2/15/2014, 7:19 p.m.
The Florida jury in the case of Michael Dunn has found him guilty on four charges, including three for second-degree ...
Outside the Duval County Courthouse Friday, February 14, 2014, as the jury deliberates the fate of Michael Dunn. Photo by martinsavidge/CNN Instagram.

Judge Russell Healey acknowledged earlier Saturday that the jury of four white women, two black women, four white men, an Asian woman and a Hispanic man was "struggling, obviously."

"But it's not for want of trying to reconcile all of this," he said then. "I think we've got some analytical people in there who are trying to do just that -- trying to analyze this from every possible angle."

The lack of a murder conviction upset some, including protesters who marched outside the Jacksonville courthouse calling for Corey to lose her job. "The people united will never be defeated," they chanted.

But Davis' mother, Lucia McBath, didn't express any anger when she addressed reporters Saturday night. Her family, she said, is "so very happy to have just a little bit of closure."

"It's sad for Mr. Dunn that he will live the rest of his life in that sense of torment, and I will pray for him," McBath said. "And I've asked my family to pray for him."

Confrontation at a gas station

It was November 23, 2012, when Michael Dunn pulled into a gas station in Jacksonville, parking next to a red Dodge Durango with four teenagers inside.

The teens had come in for gum and cigarettes; Dunn, meanwhile, had just left his son's wedding with his fiancee, who'd gone inside the convenience store for wine and chips.

Dunn didn't like the loud music -- "rap crap," as he called it -- coming from the teens' SUV. So he asked them to turn it down.

What followed next depends on whom you believe. Dunn says Davis threatened him, and he decided to take matters into his own hands upon seeing what he thought was the barrel of a gun sticking out of the Durango.

But prosecutors say it was Dunn who lost control, firing three volleys of shots -- 10 bullets total -- at the SUV over music he didn't like.

Prosecutors challenged what he did next: He left the gas station and drove to his hotel, about three miles away. There, Dunn walked his dog, ordered a pizza, then drank rum and cola -- "stunned and horrified, (shocked how) things escalated the way they did over a common courtesy."

After learning almost six hours later that he had killed Davis, Dunn testified that he became "crazy with grief," experiencing stomach problems for about four hours before taking a nap.

"My intent was to stop the attack, not necessarily end a life," he testified. "It just worked out that way."

Yet his fiancee, Rhonda Rouer, testified that Dunn had never mentioned any weapon to her -- be it a shotgun, a stick, a barrel or a lead pipe.

In fact, police found a basketball, basketball shoes, clothing, a camera tripod and cups inside the teenagers' Durango. There was no gun.

Dunn himself never called police. The first contact he had with them was at his home in Satellite Beach as he was being apprehended.

Arguing that he wasn't in a rational state of mind, Dunn admitted, "It makes sense that I should have (contacted authorities). We didn't. I can't tell you why."