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'Short Term 12' Review

By Titus Falodun Staff Writer | 9/14/2013, 4:18 p.m.
There is a force emerging from the indie sector of the film industry. Low budget no longer means low interest, ...
“Short Term 12” is a brazen and undeterred indie gem for reel diggers in search of something more filling than just popcorn and blockbusters. (Photo features Brie Larson as Grace and Keith Stanfield as Mark).

There is a force emerging from the independent sector of the film industry. Low budget no longer means low interest, especially when you have a profound story and cast to boot.

“Mud,” “Place Beyond The Pines,” and “Fruitvale Station" are some 2013 indie releases that have won over critics and audiences.

Insert “Short Term 12" as the next mesmerizing story to rise from this compelling wave of indie films.

Writer-director Destin Daniel Critten authentically depicts the world of teens and young adults that feel misunderstood and ostracized. By touching on relevant and hot-button themes, such as social disorders, abortion, and relationships, Critten makes sense of a generation that is still struggling to find its unique identity.

Brie Larson, John Gallagher, Jr., and Keith Stanfield carry this film. Larson plays Grace, a twenty-something-year-old supervisor at a foster-care facility for at-risk teenagers. She is a subdued force in this role, capturing love and grit, with an uncanny sense of gumption.

Gallagher plays Mason, Grace’s quirky and self-deprecating boyfriend, who dumps a load of embarrassment in the first five minutes of the film.

But it is Keith Stanfield as Mark that rounds out this cast and story. Mark is a troubled black teen uncomfortable with being days away from his release back into society. His frustration comes out as abrasive, but when channeled through poetics, Mark reveals that there is more to him than meets the eye.

“Short Term 12” is a brazen and undeterred indie gem for reel-diggers in search of something more filling than just popcorn and blockbusters.

Directed by Destin Daniel Critton; edited by Nat Sanders; music by Joel P. West; Running time: 1 hour 36 minutes. This film is not rated.

“Short Term 12” is now playing in Atlanta at the Landmark Midtown Art Cinema. For showtimes, visit http: www.landmarktheatres.com/Market/Atlanta/Atlanta_Frameset.htm