Quantcast

Rev Run & Jeanette Jordan Raise Diabetes Awareness

By Titus Falodun Staff Writer | 6/28/2013, 6 a.m.
Former Run-D.M.C. frontman Rev Run is spreading a new message through the microphone, as he promotes the importance of early diabetes screening. (Photos by Novo Nordisk).
Video

Rev Run & Jeanette Jordan Talk Diabetes

After speaking at St. Philip AME Church on Candler Road (Atlanta, Ga.), Rev Run and Jeanette Jordan sat down with The Atlanta Voice's Titus Falodun, and shared personal, informative, and inspirational messages about diabetes. (Videographer Titus Falodun).

After speaking at St. Philip AME Church on Candler Road (Atlanta, Ga.), Rev Run and Jeanette Jordan sat down with The Atlanta Voice's Titus Falodun, and shared personal, informative, and inspirational messages about diabetes. (Videographer Titus Falodun).

ATLANTA—Hip Hop legend-turned-minister Joseph “Rev Run” Simmons and diabetes educator Jeanette Jordan have joined forces to inform and inspire people to get screened and get healthy.

 And the duo will share their early detection campaign, “Ask. Screen. Know.”, Sunday, June 30 (1:30 p.m.) at the Saint Philip AME Church (240 Candler Road, Atlanta, GA 30317).

“Many times an artist talks about changing their diet and habit, and it helps a lot,” Rev Run said about using his music cache as a way to garner support for his cause.

Rev Run co-founded Run-D.M.C., with Daryl” DMC” McDaniels and the late DJ Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell.  

Now, Rev Run is spreading a different message through the microphone, as Jordan and he share critical and timely information, considering blacks are disproportionally affected by diabetes. 

According to The American Diabetes Association, five million African Americans aged 20 and older have the disease. Diabetes affects an estimated 25 million people in the United States. 

“The goal of this national campaign is to educate people about their risks,” Jordan said. “And we want to raise awareness for the need for people to get screened, because we can’t control what we don’t know.” 

Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease, include being 45 years or older, lack of physical exercise, being overweight, having high blood pressure and diabetes in the family. Type 2 diabetes is more common in certain ethnic groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, American Indians and Alaska Indians. 

“I believe the best way to teach anybody is to do it by example,” Rev Run said. “My kids saw me last night. And they were eating cake and I went and got some light yogurt. Everybody commented, ‘Look at daddy.’ They’re seeing me on my grind, and it definitely helps when telling them.”

Diabetes can lead to various health complications including blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke and amputations.

But there are ways to prevent these things, if the proper steps are taken.   

“Not only exercise, but watch your weight and what you’re eating,” Rev Run said. “Make sure you’re doing everything in moderation.” 

Furthermore, Rev Run explained how having a physical examination by a doctor is not enough. 

“If you don’t asked to be screened for diabetes, you might not get screened,” he said. 

Fresh produce is the ideal. But frozen or canned vegetables, as well as being moderate as to how much starch (i.e. rice, cornbread, potato salad, etc.) is thrown on the plate can help in diabetes prevention and control. 

“Diabetes is a controllable condition,” Jordan said. “It’s just a matter of knowing your risk, and then doing something about that risk, by making some lifestyle changes.” 

Diabetes’ reach is widespread. But Rev Run hopes his message can help to eradicate diabetes’ harmful impact. 

“I believe it is my calling,” he said. “For some reason, I think God just wants me to talk about this. So, if I stay on it, I believe I can get it done.” 

Coincidentally, Rev Run’s birthdate, November 14th, is the same day as World Diabetes Day.

For information about the campaign, visit: askscreenknow.com.