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Your Voice: "What stood out to you in Obama’s address at the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington?"

Compiled by Vincent Christie at the CNN Center | 8/30/2013, 9:37 a.m.
Danette Jackson, Atlanta: “When he spoke about the Black men staying in the family or staying in the home and raising his son. Just his presence is an important thing. Also something that stuck out to me was when he said when we can get passed the race and the color of people and just be a partner to your fellow man and just come together as one, if we could just get passed that, then this country could move forward.” Photo by Vincent Christie.

Danette Jackson, Atlanta

“When he spoke about the Black men staying in the family or staying in the home and raising his son. Just his presence is an important thing. Also something that stuck out to me was when he said when we can get passed the race and the color of people and just be a partner to your fellow man and just come together as one, if we could just get passed that, then this country could move forward.”

Pamela Little, Atlanta

“I liked the fact that he talked about equalization and putting everybody on the same playing field and giving us an opportunity for better education, better resources and better finances.”

Anthony Brooks, Stone Mountain

“I liked the way he presents his speeches and he seems to have a great heart.”

Abeola Abegasoie, Atlanta

“The fact that when Obama talked about courage and that courage means people standing together because change comes in numbers, when we all work together in groups. Once one person stands up, more people stand up and we all work together and differences happen.”

Juanita Mosely, Austell

“He wasn’t just speaking to Black people, he was speaking to everybody. And he included everybody in his speech. So nobody can say that ‘he didn’t say this because he’s a Black president.’ He spoke to everybody.”

Amayia Smith, McDonough

“I think he called for action. I think he brought some type of awareness of what’s going on around us [African Americans.] In addition to that I think he spoke to everybody. I think that every race can pull something out of his speech. I think it’s ironic that he was two when Martin Luther King made the speech and that he’s the one delivering the message now. It’s profound. It’s just a great part of history.”

Paul Gross, Atlanta

"I was impressed by the fact that he said we had a job to do and it was important, and that we should not let the legacy of King die."