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Martin Luther King, on Twitter and Facebook?

By Robert M. Franklin Special to CNN | 8/8/2013, 10:22 a.m.

Editor's note: The Rev. Dr. Robert Michael Franklin, Jr. is a Visiting Scholar in Residence at Stanford University's Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute. He is president emeritus of Morehouse College, where he served as the 10th president from 2007 to 2012. In January 2014, he becomes director of the religion program at The Chautauqua Institution. Franklin is the author of three books and wrote the foreword to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail," reprinted by Trinity Forum in 2012.

"Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end." - Henry David Thoreau

The March on Washington in 1963 was a day for great speeches. Of course, no one knew that the day would also include one of the most famous speeches of the 20th century, Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" oration (actually titled, "Normalcy No More").

In fact, King's adviser and draft speechwriter, Clarence B. Jones, says that with everyone consumed by march logistics, the speech was not their highest priority, and hours before the event while King was considering a theme for his speech he didn't know exactly what he would say. Ah, the triumph of procrastination.

It was a different time, a time when politicians like JFK and preachers like MLK made efforts to craft big ideas in beautiful language. It was the age of thriving newspapers and bookstores. Back then, audiences listened expectantly for the art of rhetoric. They demanded that speakers respect them enough to put real effort and poetry into their publicly spoken words. And, they listened without the pressure and distraction of multitasking on mobile devices. They listened patiently, even while sweating profusely in the August heat.

What about today, in the age of social media? Would Martin Luther King, Jr. be an active social media communicator? And, a more important question: How well would Martin Luther King, Jr.'s gift for rhetoric translate over social networks?

The answer to both questions is positive.

As a public theologian he had an encyclopedic knowledge of political writings and literature. He had an amazing ability to educate, inspire and mobilize people through language and speech. He would have recognized that social media is the public square of the 21st century. A keen communicator could not afford to be silent in this space.

According to King's advisers, Clarence B. Jones and Andrew Young, Martin would have utilized Twitter and other social media. Jones says, "He would be up all hours of the night telling me and Stanley Levison his thoughts and we would have learned to send tweets."

It's worth noting that during the mid-1950s, King (most likely assisted by a staff member) responded to readers' letters in his "Advice for Living" column in Ebony Magazine. He did this in order to communicate with a more diverse audience through popular media. He discontinued the responses after his life became too busy and his doctor recommended a slower pace following his 1958 stabbing.